Motorola sees future in Bluetooth accessories

By James Wells

SYDNEY: Motorola has released a range of new Bluetooth-enabled accessories which have used external partnerships and licensing agreements to increase the awareness of the category beyond the traditional mobile phone segment.

According to Motorola Mobile Devices public relations manager, Peter Joblin, Motorola currently holds 40 per cent of the global share of the Bluetooth accessories market to mobile phones and this share is larger in the Australian market.

“The explosive growth is across companion products in retail which are supported by alliances with companies including Bose, Skype, JBL and Burton,” Joblin told current.com.au.

New Bluetooth enabled products include the O ROKR sunglasses made in conjunction with Oakley that allow users to conduct a phone conversation through a microphone and headphones built into the eyewear.

Motorola has also formed a partnership with Dolce & Gabbana (D&G) to produce a limited number of gold mobile handsets which come with an eel skin case, matching gold headset and D&G-branded cleaning cloth.

“These alliances deliver creditability and show how the technology has changed since it was introduced in the early 1990s. It is no longer just mobile handsets, it is now used in apparel such as the Bluetooth-enabled ski jackets and music on the go with Bluetooth wireless headphones. Bluetooth is no longer just about a mobile phone and a compatible ear-piece – this is a dynamic change for the industry,” Joblin said.

According to Mototola business manager – mobile devices, John Demezieres, the next evolution for the technology is stereo Bluetooth as well as colour-coordination of accessories.

“Bluetooth in its simplest form is eliminating wires. The most common questions consumers ask when they are buying a phone is – does it have a camera and does it have Bluetooth. Retailers need to understand the capabilities which are now available to the consumer as our research has shown that a Bluetooth user will actually spend more than an average user.

“The average Bluetooth consumers are generally professionals and active lifestyle people. They have a male skew and they are generally image savvy people who like purchasing well-fashioned and stylish beautiful products,” Joblin said.

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